About ActiveCare PT:


  • Our therapists are licensed in New York State and active members in the American Physical Therapy Association. We have advanced training in joint mobilization and myofascial release techniques.
  • We are dedicated practitioners with a passion for the profession and a comprehensive, holistic approach to treatment and healing. We treat each patient as an individual and treat the whole person, with a plan of care designed to meet the patient’s set goals for health, functionality and a return to work, tasks and activities. We network with a team of physicians, chiropractors, acupuncturists and massage therapists in order to provide guidance to other modalities that may be effective in the patients’ care.
  • Physical Therapist and owner Karena Wu is a graduate of the Program in Physical Therapy at Columbia University and is affiliated with several healthcare organizations in New York City. She is certified as a Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Kinesio Taping Practitioner and Pilates Instructor, and uses SpiderTech Taping.
  • ActiveCare is primarily an out-of-network facility. We accept all insurance with out-of-network benefits and file for most major insurance plans. We work with all prospective patients to create workable payment plans regardless of insurance coverage.
  • ActiveCare accepts Medicare, No-Fault and Workers’ Compensation patients depending on schedule availability.
  • ActiveCare’s administrators provide seamless and efficient concierge-style client service to all of our patients. And the whole ActiveCare team makes sure your time with us is a beneficial, productive and enjoyable experience.

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ActiveCare Physical Therapy, Inc.


Karena Wu, DPT, MS, COMT, CSCS, CKTP, CPI
FMS AND SFMA Certified
12 W 37th St. Ste. 1202
New York, NY 10018
(212) 777-4374

staff@bestptnyc.com

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Tennis Elbow Physical Therapy

Best Physical Therapist NYC Tennis Elbow WimbledonWith Wimbledon in full, ahem, swing, I’ve got tennis fever! (Go Rafa!) And, unfortunately, many of my physical therapy patients have it too, leading to tennis elbow. Tennis elbow is a classic in the physical therapy canon- in fact, sometimes I think my practice exists solely to work on those tricky painful elbows. Especially by the end of the summer, when all those overswung forehands and backhands bear their painful fruit.

Best Physical Therapist NYC Tennis Elbow painSo what is tennis elbow really? Well, it’s when the area above and outside the elbow becomes painful, often as a result from a small tear in the tendon that connects that outer arm muscle to the bone. The increasing soreness, plus the weakening of the grip that accompanies it, has been a scourge to tennis players, pro and amateur alike, since, people first set foot on the grass at the All England Club, back in 1876. Mostly tennis elbow is the result of overuse of the elbow- we often forget all about having strong wrists, which is actually a key to healthy elbows AND a great tennis game.

As the best physical therapist in all of New York City, I have a very clean approach to working on this common problem.

Best Physical Therapist NYC Tennis Elbow Muscles1) I use a series of mobilizations to the area around the elbow joint- which is also know as the proximal radial-ulnar joint. These mobilizations, include the elbow joint itself, anterior-posterior mobilizations to the radial head, extension at the elbow joint and carpal mobilization, in the wrist, to fully shake out all that soreness.

2) Soft tissue mobilization is another key approach to taming that tennis elbow. I work at releasing the pronator teres, which is that oh-so important muscle that wraps around the top your forearm and really gets painful, both from tennis, and carpal tunnel syndrome. And I massage and stretch the Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis, which extends just above your wrist, above your thumb. You want these muscles strong and healthy, because they bear the brunt of those intense racket swings, and the force of the ball hitting the racket.

3) And last, but not least, I start the last stage of treatment with the patients by working the wrist in a series of stretches – followed by gently strengthening in that area as well as the shoulder and elbow joint.

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